Overleaf Chapbook Contest

leaf_press_4c_2014The Overleaf Chapbook Manuscript Competition awards contracts to one Canadian and one international poet each year. Winners receive 50 copies of their chapbook as well as publicity and $100.00 to put towards refreshments for a launch party in their home town. Everyone who enters receives a poetry book of their choice from the Leaf Press catalogue (shipping paid). Entry is $25.00 CAN; deadline August 15th, 2015.
Details Here: http://leafpress.ca/guidelines-overleaf.htm

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The Last Breadline

VermillionI remember the late Marion Kimes saying that Red Sky Poetry Theater was successful in part because of some of the spinoff groups that came from it, including Subtext and SPLAB. SPLAB takes a modicum of pride in the highly successful Breadline reading series which was started by three Seattle poets who met at the old SPLAB venue in Columbia City. Greg Bem, Alex Bleecker and Jeremy Springsteed created a multi-media reading on Capitol Hill which garnered great reviews, had excellent attendance an was not afraid to put a molecular biologist on the mic between a poet and a rock band. Their last event is June 17 and it coincides with the release of an anthology they’ve created taken from many of the featured readers over the years. What was happening in Seattle writing between 2011 and 2015? The anthology will give you a very good sense of that. Congrats Breadliners. Now get some rest before your next projects.

dearly beloved,
we know we’ve cried wolf before, but now we’re crying wolf and we really mean it.  won’t you join us for the very last breadline ever – next wed, june 17th?  we’ve got 5 phenom features – bay area poet/essayist amy glynn, essayist steve barker, poet shae savoy, prose writer anne bean, and singer-songwriter trent thornley – who will simply destroy you.  come get destroyed.
we’re also releasing our 4-year culminating anthology, and encouraging all contributors to come share their pieces, so you’re in for a erkstra spershal treat.  followed, time permitting, by the 24-hour open mic.  come say goodbye with us…
– a/j/g
The Very Last Breadline
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Review of Make It True: Poetry From Cascadia

Make It True cover (front and back)Bless Mary Ann Moore for her wonderful review of the new anthology of Cascadia Poetry Make It True. Dig:

In Lowther’s poem, Nuu-chah-nulth, Good Advice, the decolonization of “my mind,” aligns very nicely with co-editor Paul Nelson’s introductory words about the “wilderness of the mind.”

Lowther writes: “I’ve been advised not to study / French or Spanish, rather / to stand still, make roots from words, / take in the language of the place / I’ve made my home.”

Standing still, listening, observing, witnessing are all practices of the eco-conscious poets in Cascadia. They “take in the language of the place.”

Cascadia is a bioregion spanning from Cape Mendocino in the south to Mount Logan in the north. It is that “bioregionalism, or the effort to reimagine ourselves and the places where we live in terms of ecology, sustainability and harmony with the natural systems” that inspired the four editors in the book’s creation.

The review first ran in the Vancouver Sun and also ran in the Edmonton Journal.

More info on the book here: http://www.leafpress.ca/Make_It_True/Make_It_True.htm

Vancouver Sun Make It True

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Port Alberni News on Cascadia Po Fest

Photo from Avenue.zone

Photo from Avenue.zone

There are two short and very sweet write-ups on the recent Cascadia Poetry Festival staged in Nanaimo, BC, on Vancouver Island Apr 30-May 3. The first by young poet Winter Darbley starts:

I knew that I was going to have fun the minute I walked up to the campus and saw the lawn full of bunnies and the horde of yellow-tagged poets climbing up the stairs. There were colourful characters from every walk of life–quiet little elderly ladies, mountainously vivid young ladies, rugged young men, and many an eccentric, hat-wearing bearded poet. Some had travelled from Seattle or Oregon to be there. There was one strikingly talented poet from Iraq, with a brilliant headscarf that matched the splendour of her words.

The second by Judith Hutchison says:

These were people who think poetry is important and who spend their lives writing and reading poetry every day. They came together to share their poems with each other as a celebration and exploration of Cascadia. Cascadia is not an imaginary place identified by arbitrary political lines on a paper map, but a real place, identified by its geography (northwest ocean and mountain bound) as a dynamic bioregion. To think and act from a feeling of membership in Cascadia requires a shift in consciousness. This transformation of attitude fosters new relationships, whether they be with native and immigrant people, with those who live on the other side of a political division, or with fellow residents who are members of other species.

Both pieces are linked here: http://www.avenue.zone/a-participant-at-large-at-the-cascadia-poetry-festival-iii-nanaimo/

The notion that people would begin to understand the depth at which the bioregional approach works is part of this work. It is also part cultural investigation and animation, that is bringing to life the culture that is there but often buried under the debris of the industry-generated-culture. That participants would want to attend future iterations of the fest is also one of the goals of this work, which is why the Seattle 2016 local organizing committee will be meeting in the next month to form and ensure that the festival can build on the success of Nanaimo. Hats off again to David Fraser, Kim Clark, Kim Golbery, Mary Ann Moore, Ursula Vaira and all the other members of the Nanaimo local organizing committee.

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