Levertov Plaque

One of the most important poets ever to live and work in Seattle, Denise Levertov died in 1997. There is no mention of her time in Seattle outside the Seward Park house she called home for eight years, but thanks to the Rainier Valley Rotary, SPLAB is spear-heading an Indiegogo campaign to purchase and install the plaque. The campaign would also support the 4th Cascadia Poetry Festival, Nov 3-6, 2016, in Seattle at Spring Street Center, which is dedicated to the memory and will explore the legacy of Levertov in Cascadia. Specifically, funds would support the panel on Levertov’s legacy and the ritual walk to her grave on Sunday morning led by JM Miller, Brenda Hillman and Daphne Marlatt. Our thanks go to the Rotary’s Jayne DeHaan, who spearheaded the project.

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Contributors to the fundraising effort are offered a plethora of festival-related premiums which can be perused here:

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Pageboy Magazine Call

From PageBoy Magazine:

PageBoy 2013

PageBoy 2013

PageBoy invites you to submit original work in any form on the theme “writers on writers.” Please consider writing something on your favorite author, or your least favorite author; or on an author you feel deserves more attention, or on an author you feel deserves less. Homage/essay/elegy/interview/rant/criticism/limerick/etc. will all be considered for publication in our upcoming, ninth issue. Subjects can be well known or little known, widely published or not at all, so long as the piece itself is interesting enough. Work should be submitted by Nov. 15th. pageboymagazine (at) hotmail (dot) com

Please feel free to pass this on to writers who may be interested.

We look forward to reading your work,

– PageBoy Crew

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Nimrod Submissions

Nimrod LogoFrom the Nimrod Journal:

Call for Submissions LEAVING HOME, FINDING HOME

Home. It’s a concept that stretches across all cultures and all times. But what makes a home? Why do we sometimes seek out new homes, or refuse to leave the homes we already have? How do we find—and adapt to—new homes? When is leaving home a choice, when an exile? What happens when we are forced to leave homes we do not necessarily want to abandon? How do we make a place—a house, a country, a continent—into a home? Does home refer primarily to a place, or to the people who live there? Can home be an internal state of mind?

For our Spring/Summer 2017 issue, Leaving Home, Finding HomeNimrod International Journal is seeking poetry, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces that explore ideas of home—both leaving home and finding home.

What We Are Seeking:

We invite poems, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces that explore ideas of home. We are open to all interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories. Just a few examples of material that would be of interest to us include

  • Work about immigration, especially from first-generation immigrants to or from any country
  • Work from refugees leaving one home to seek another
  • Work from “Third Culture Kids,” those raised in a culture outside their parents’ culture
  • Work from expatriates living in countries not their own
  • Work about age and home, whether stories of young people leaving home for the first time or older people transitioning to new homes
  • Work that explores the connections between families and homes
  • Work about home as a state of mind
  • Work about the environment as home—for humans and for plants and animals
  • Work in translation

We hope to receive a large variety of material for this issue, including work from writers of color, writers of marginalized orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, physically different writers, and neuroatypical writers. We are especially interested in material from immigrants, migrants, and those raised outside their parents’ culture. Most of all, we hope to be surprised.

We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and/or share this announcement with writing groups and friends. We eagerly anticipate your response.

The Specifics:

  • Stories and creative nonfiction may be up to 7,500 words; poetry may be up to 8 pages.
  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • You may submit poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, but we ask that they be sent as separate submissions.
  • Fiction should be typed, double-spaced with 1” margins on all sides, one side of plain white paper only.  Poetry should be typed, one side of plain white paper only.
  • For those submitting by mail: Please mark both your cover letter and the outer envelope with “Spring 2017 Theme.” Send a SASE for response. Postal submissions are free.
  • For those submitting online: Please submit work online under the theme category at https://nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit
  • A $3 fee is charged for online submissions to cover the administrative costs associated with those submissions.
  • If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.eduwith your request and reasons for seeking a waiver.

Postmark deadline: November 5th, 2016

Publication date: April 2017

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published in print by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine receive two copies of the issues in which their work appears.

Send postal manuscripts to:

Nimrod Journal

The University of Tulsa

800 S. Tucker Dr.

Tulsa, OK 74104

 

Submit online at:

 https://nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit

Questions?

Email nimrod@utulsa.edu, call (918) 631-3080, or visit us online at http://www.utulsa.edu/nimrod.

 

– –

Nimrod International Journal

The University of Tulsa

800 S. Tucker Dr.

Tulsa, OK 74104

(918) 631-3080

www.utulsa.edu/nimrod

www.facebook.com/nimrodjournal

nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit

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