Andrew Schelling on SPLAB Presents

Andrew Schelling

Andrew Schelling is a poet, translator and longtime teacher at the

From the Arapaho Songbook

Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics in Boulder, Colorado, part of Naropa University, as well as the Deer Park Institute in India. In July, 2011, he talked with Paul Nelson about his new book: From the Arapaho Songbook. SPLAB Presents for the week of Oct 3, 2011 is archived here. The whole interview is archived here.

About Splabman

SPLAB founder Paul Nelson wrote Organic Poetry (VDM Verlag, German, 2008) as well as a serial poem re-enacting the history of Auburn, Washington, A Time Before Slaughter (Apprentice House, 2010). In 26 years of radio he interviewed Allen Ginsberg, Michael McClure, Anne Waldman, Sam Hamill, Robin Blaser, Nate Mackey, Eileen Myles, Wanda Coleman, George Bowering, Joanne Kyger, Jerome Rothenberg & others. Founder of the Cascadia Poetry Festival, recent publications on and off-line include: Hambone, Pageboy, Menacing Hedge, Fieralingue, Rain Taxi, Solitary Plover, the Soul of the Earth anthology, Along the Rim: The Best of the Pacific Rim Review (Vol 2), Inactual, Raft magazine and Golden Handcuffs Review. He lives in Seattle, won the 2014 Robin Blaser Award from the Capilano Review and writes at least one American Sentence every day.
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4 Responses to Andrew Schelling on SPLAB Presents

  1. Paul,
    This is an excellent piece on intuitive poetic creation and a nifty format you have set up.
    Kudos for SPLAB and its MAN!
    BBird

  2. Splabman says:

    Thanks Carol. We hope to get a lot more interviews on-line. Abrazos,
    Paul

  3. Pam says:

    What does he mean in this interview by “a visitor from up north, I will try to kill it”, a line from his deformation poem, do you think?

  4. Splabman says:

    I think it was the English translation of the Arapaho ( I believe) line from an indigenous hunter who was speaking about prey. In that culture (as in many indigenous cultures) other animals are considered people, so a visitor from the north might be a member of a pack of animals that may provide sustenance. Thanks for listening.

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